Awards & Citations - RAAC & Sub Units that served with the RAAC in Viet Nam

&

Foreign Awards - for RAAC members who served in SVN

 

The following list was compiled by Ian Mc Vie.

 

Army Number: 41691

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Jeno

Surname: ALTORJAY

Honour or Award: MID

Major Jeno Altorjay enlisted into the Australian Army on 15 January 1954 and was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He was commissioned on 28 September 1957 and after a number of regimental and staff appointments in Australia, he arrived in Vietnam on 28 May 1969 as the Ground Liaison Officer with 67th Ground Liaison Section. After four months in that appointment he was posted as the General Staff Officer Grade 2 (Air) at Headquarters First Australian Task Force where he served until 28 May 1970. Major Altorjay brought to both of his appointments in Vietnam a wide experience, a practical approach and a devotion to duty that has been an inspiration to all who have been associated with him. His enthusiasm and profound professional knowledge have endeared him to both United States Air Force and Army officers with whom he had continuous dealings, and helped produce a fine rapport with these supporting agencies. He worked tirelessly to maintain the high mutual confidence and special relationship between 9 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force, and units in the Task Force.

Major Altorjay has displayed an untiring enthusiasm and consistently sound judgement throughout his tour reflecting great credit on himself and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 1200348

Substantive Rank; Corporal

Christian Name: Andrew Martin

Surname: ANDERSON

Honour or Award: MID

Corporal Andrew Anderson enlisted in the Australian Army on 5 October 1964 and was allotted to The Royal Australian Infantry Corp's. He served with the 1st Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment in South Vietnam in 1965, and subsequently transferred to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps on 19 June 1970. He was posted to the 1st Armoured Regiment as a Tank Troop Corporal in South Vietnam on 27 April 197 1. On 25 June 1971, Corporal Anderson commanded the left flank tank of 3rd Troop of his Squadron during a Squadron assault on an occupied enemy bunker system in the north west of Phuoc Tuy Province. However, the progress of the assault was held up by a barrier of thick bamboo. Without regard for his personal safety, Corporal Anderson broke from the assault formation and manoeuvred his tank to smash down the bamboo obstacle. The enemy was then forced to reveal his position by firing on Corporal Anderson's tank. As a result of his selfless act, Corporal Anderson was very seriously wounded.

Corporal Anderson at terrible personal cost on that day prepared the way for the destruction of the enemy force. His action was an inspiration to the remainder of the force and reflects great credit upon himself, his Regiment and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 235254

Substantive Rank: Captain

Christian Name: Thomas Henry

Surname:. ARROWSMITH

Honour or Award: MID Now upgraded to Medal for Gallantry (MG)

Captain Thomas Arrowsmith graduated from Royal Military College, Duntroon on 11 December 1963 and was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined A Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment in South Vietnam in October 1968, and was transferred to B Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment in May 1969.

On 19 January 1969, Captain Arrowsmith was the Commander of a combined Special Air Service, infantry and cavalry ambush which had been observing an enemy 'supply route for several days. At 1715 hours a successful ambush was initiated against an enemy party. Several hours later the enemy probed the ambush site and attempted to overrun the Special Air Service position. Captain Arrowsmith calmly deployed his troop and with skilful timing and fire control extracted the Special Air Service group to safety, without casualties.

On 29 May 1969, Captain Arrowsmith was deployed in combined infantry and cavalry ambush sites on Route 328. At 2030 hours, two ambush points were initiated against a force of over 50,.resulting in substantial casualties to the enemy. Throughout the night Captain Arrowsmith calmly controlled his troops in the ambush sites, reassuring his force by his own confidence, although out of artillery range and expecting an enemy counter attack at any time. Next day, in returning to base down Route 328, he again came in contact with the enemy. In close country and whilst being fired upon by enemy rocket launchers, he skilfully manoeuvered his force, completely routing the enemy, without casualties to his troops.

In these contacts with the enemy and in other such engagements, Captain Arrowsrnith has displayed a standard of professionalism and personal courage, that has been an inspiration to troops serving under him and to the remainder of the Squadron.

 

Army Number: 235121

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Peter Richard

Surname: BADMAN

Honour or Award. MID

Major Peter Badman graduated from The Royal Military College, Duntroon on 11 December 1957 and was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. After various regimental and training appointments, including advanced training in the United Kingdom and Germany, he assumed command of C Squadron, lst Armoured Regiment on 27 November 1967. He arrived in South Vietnam on 15 January 1968.

Major Badrnan had the distinction of commanding the first Squadron of battle tanks deployed from Australia since World War Two. His period of command in South Vietnam has been one of constant challenge and on every occasion he has met the challenge with determination, initiative and drive.

As a result of the high standards he set and achieved, his Squadron was able to play a valuable part in many actions in the provinces of Phuoc Tuy and Bien Hoa. On a number of occasions the accurate and reliable fire provided by his tanks in -lose country was a major factor in the success of attacks on bunker systems and in the safe extraction of troops pinned down by enemy fire.

The achievement of C Squadron, lst Armoured Regiment were largely due to Major Badman's sound judgement and aggressive spirit. His leadership and example were an inspiration to the troops he commanded.

 

Army Number: 2273

Substantive Rank: Colonel

Christian Name: Mark

Surname: BRADBURY

Honour or Award: CBE

Colonel Bradbury graduated from The Royal Military College, Duntroon, in December 1942, and served with conspicuous success in a number of regimental and staff appointment in Australia, New Guinea, the United Kingdom and Singapore before arriving in the Republic of Viet Nam in March 1968, to take up the appointment of Chief of Staff of the Army Component of the Australian Force.

Colonel Bradbury has given to his appointment his undivided and unremitting attention and has worked extremely long hours, frequently under the most difficult conditions. The high standard of his professional knowledge, coupled with his personal drive and enthusiasm, have ensured that the administrative and logistic procedures employed in the Army Component have kept pace with the ever-changing requirements and priorities dictated by the Operational situation. He has consistently foreseen areas of responsibility in which difficulties might arise, and has thus been able to anticipate the measures necessary to ensure the effective administration of the Component at all times.

In his appointment as Chief of Staff, Colonel Bradbury has maintained close and continuing contacts with senior officers of the other Australian Services and with New Zealand, United States and Vietnamese Commanders and staff officers. These contacts have gained for him an enviable reputation as a highly efficient and dedicated staff officer who has at all times placed the interests of his country and his service above all other considerations.

By his devotion to duty, powers of leadership, loyalty and personality, Colonel Bradbury has been an inspiration to members of the Headquarters of the Australian Force in Vietnam and has brought great credit to himself and. to the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 1202047

Substantive Rank: Lance Corporal

Christian Name: Peter John

Surname: BEST

Honour or Award: MID

Lance Corporal Peter Best enlisted in the Australian Regular Army on 9 April 1968 and was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined the lst Armoured Regiment at Puckapunyal in September 1968, was posted to B Squadron, 1st Armoured Regiment and arrived in South Vietnam on 10 September 1969,

On 18 March 1970, at about 1500 hours, a fire which had been burning in the minefield surrounding the Duc Thanh District Headquarters, spread to one of the provincial force houses in the compound. The high winds quickly fanned the fire until the whole compound was in danger of being destroyed.

Two fully stocked ammunition bunkers and the United States Advisory Team gas supply were adjacent to the blaze. Lance Corporal Best, sensing the danger, went to help the Advisory Team personnel extinguish the blaze. Without regard for his own personal safety, he assumed the position nearest the blazing fire. The heat of the fire had now detonated ammunition, grenades and claymore mines which had been sorted in a number of houses thus making the task of fighting the fire a dangerous one.

Lance Corporal Best continued to fight the fire and when the ammunition bunker was directly threatened, climbed on top of it to extinguish the portions which ignited. He continued to set an example until the fire was brought under control.

Lance Corporal Best displayed admirable qualities of leadership, courage, perseverance and physical endurance during the time he was fighting the fire. His brave, dedicated example, without regard for his own safety, was an inspiration to his comrades. Lance Corporal Best's actions earned the respect of the Vietnamese, Americans and fellow Australians who were present.

These actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Military Service and reflect credit upon himself, his Regiment and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 235339

Substantive Rank: Lieutenant

Christian Name: John Harry

Surname: BRENNAN

Honour or Award: MID

Lieutenant John Harry Brennan graduated from The Royal Military College, Duntroon on 11 December 1968 and was commissioned into The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. On 29 January 1970, he arrived in Vietnam and joined A Squadron, First Armoured Regiment.

During Operation Hammersley Lieutenant Brennan's Troop was under operational control of a Company of 8th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment. On 18 February 1970 whilst moving in the area of the Long Hai Hills in Phuoc Tuy Province, the company group came under heavy small arms and anti-tank fire from an estimated two companies of enemy occupying heavily fortified bunkers. A major battle developed and the company group deployed to assault the bunker system. Before contact with the enemy was broken, by a hail of enemy anti-tank rockets. Lieutenant Brennan led and manoeuvred his Troop with professional skill and personal bravery, inflicting heavy damage on the strongly entrenched enemy. His own tank was hit eight times by anti-tank rockets during the assaults. As the company group withdrew through the bunkers after the second assault, an armoured personnel carrier was hit by enemy anti-tank fire. Despite the damage to his own tank, and the continuing heavy fire from the enemy bunkers, Lieutenant Brennan helped organise, and took part in the recovery of the armoured personnel carrier.

Lieutenant Brennan's professional skill, outstanding leadership and personal bravery were an inspiration to all those soldiers involved in the battle and were decisive factors in the success of the attack.

Army Number: 52580

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Bruce Creighton

Surname. BARRETT

Honour or Award: MID

Major Bruce Barrett graduated from the Officer Cadet School, Portsea on 26 June 1953 and was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. After a variety of regimental and staff appointments in Australia and overseas, he arrived in South Vietnam on 7 January 1969.

Major Barrett served as Deputy Assistant Quartermaster General (Operations) at First Australian Logistic Support Group for the first eight months of his tour in Vietnam. His thorough understanding of logistic matters together with his ability to work harmoniously with the supporting United States Army Logistic Organisation enabled his group to provide an outstanding service to the First Australian Task Force.

In September 1969, he was called on unexpectedly to fill the appointment of Deputy Assistant Quartermaster General at First Australian Task Force. For the remainder of his tour in Vietnam, he worked tirelessly to ensure that the combat units engaged in operations were never short of their essential requirements.

His cheerful efficiency throughout his tour was a constant source of inspiration to all who worked with him and a fine example of a selfless staff officer.

 

Army Number: 17023

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Henry John

Surname: COATES

Honour or Award: MBE

Major Henry John Coates graduated from The Royal Military College Duntroon on 14 December 1955 and was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He arrived in South Vietnam on 27 May 1970 as Officer Commanding B Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment.

From the outset Major Coates displayed drive and aggression characteristic of a sound cavalry Commander. Through his assessment of the capacity of each of the sub units under his command he was able to deploy the correct force to meet the particular requirements of a given task.

On 29 November 1970, in the village of Kuen Noc, Phuoc Tuy Province Vietnam, when a Vietnamese post was over-run by the enemy, Major Coates was appointed to the command of a relief force to stabilise the situation. his swift reaction and determined leadership on this occasion was an inspiration to the whole force in the Corps area of operations.

Major Coates was appointed the principal Operations Staff Officer on Headquarters lst Australian Task Force on 4 January 1971. In this position, Major Coates used his professional ability and operational experience to readily assess a situation thereby providing sound staff direction and support of units deployed on operations. His singular success in carrying out operational and staff tasks reflect credit to himself, his Corps and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 53023

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Malcolm Alwynne

Surname. COUNT

Honour or Award; MBE

Major Malcolm Count graduated from the Officer Cadet School on 14 December 1956 and was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined Headquarters, lst Australian Task Force, in South Vietnam on 18 June 1970 as the Deputy Assistant Adjutant General.

During his tour of duty, Major Count rendered outstanding service to his two successive Commanders, to unit Commanders and to all ranks of the lst Australian Task Force. His tireless efforts, by day and by night, provided them all with personal administrative support of the highest order. His deep concern was that every member of the lst Australian Task Force should be individually administered; he achieved this task to such a degree that the greater majority of personal problems arising were solved with utmost dispatch and efficiency.

The enduring high standards of morale, health and welfare evident in the lst Australian Task Force are largely a tribute to Major Count's continual and painstaking efforts which were motivated by sincere and practical concern for the well being of all ranks. His service in this appointment was a credit to himself, his Regiment and to the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 3798399

Substantive Rank: Trooper

Christian Name. Peter Stanley

Surname: CADGE

Honour or Award. MID

Trooper Peter Cadge enlisted in the Australia Army on 22 April 1970. He was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps and joined the lst Armoured Regiment on 21 August 1970. He joined C Squadron, lst Armoured Regiment in Vietnam on 6 April 1971.

On 25 June 1971, during Operation Hermit Park, Trooper Cadge was driving the Troop Leader's Tank of 5th Troop. The tank was engaged and hit by enemy rocket propelled grenade fire resulting in Trooper Cadge being very seriously wounded.

Trooper Cadge was unable to communicate with the remainder of the tank crew as his radio headset had been rendered inoperable by enemy fire. Seeing the mantelet cover above his head burning, he assumed that the tank was on fire and that the remaining members of his crew were in danger. Although badly wounded and still under enemy fire, he immediately stood up and attempted to go to their aid; in doing so, due to this wounds, he collapsed across the front of his tank.

Trooper Cadge was removed from the front of the tank by his troop leader and placed in a position of relative safety to the rear of his tank. He remained alone but calm in that position, after assurance that the rest of the crew were safe, until the enemy weapons were suppressed, the Troop position secured and his evacuation arranged.

Trooper Cadge, by his concern for the remainder of his crew and by his coolness under fire on that day, was an inspiration to all. His actions reflect great credit upon himself, his Regiment and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number. 312785

Substantive Rank: Second Lieutenant

Christian Name: Bruce

Surname: CAMERON

Honour or Award: MC

Second Lieutenant Bruce Cameron graduated from the Officer Cadet School, Portsea on 14 June 1969, and was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined C Squadron, lst Armoured Regiment, on 1 January 1970, and arrived in South Vietnam on 21st January 1971.

On 7 June 1971, during Operation Overlord, Second Lieutenant Cameron was deploying his tank Troop to give support to an infantry Company when the Troop was engaged by fire from an enemy bunker system. He immediately gave orders for his Troop to launch an attack against the well defended bunker complex. In the course of the attack, Second Lieutenant Cameron was wounded by the heavy fire which the enemy was directing against the tank Troop, but despite his wound, he remained calm and resolutely pressed on with the Troop attack. His determined leadership and swift action forced the enemy's withdrawal from the forward bunkers and contributed greatly to the defeat of the entire enemy force.

Late in June 1971 during an assault on another bunker system, his tank was hit by enemy fire and his driver received head injuries and collapsed across the front of his tank. Ordering his crew to continue firing, Second lieutenant Cameron dismounted and moved his driver to safety thus saying him from further serious injury. Again in July 197 1, Second Lieutenant Cameron moved his tank Troop to give support to an infantry Platoon which had taken casualties from, and was pinned down by, enemy fire from a bunker complex. However, due to the position of one of the platoon's casualties, his Troop was unable to give effective fire support. At the request of the Platoon Commander, Second Lieutenant Cameron moved his tank forward to crush a bunker from which enemy fire was being received. As a result of this action, the remainder of his Troop was able to be moved between other bunkers and the casualty and give the covering fire needed to allow evacuation of the wounded.

Second Lieutenant Cameron's sustained personal courage and determined leadership reflect great credit upon himself, his Regiment and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number. 38317

Substantive Rank; Trooper

Temporary Rank: Corporal

Christian Name: John Alexander

Surname: CARTER

Honour or Award: DCM

At approximately 1800 hours 18 August 1966 Corporal John Carter was the Crew Commander of an armoured personnel carrier of 3 Troop First Armoured Personnel Carrier Squadron. This Troop had been given the task of carrying a relieving force of Infantry to assist D Company 6 Battalion Royal Australian Regiment which was in heavy contact with a brigade sized enemy force. Orders were for the carrier Troop to advance with two sections forward. Weather conditions at the time were extremely difficult due to a severe rain storm.

When contact was made with the enemy, Corporal Carter's vehicle was engaged by fire from 57 millimetre recoilless rifle, machine gun and small arms fire. The projectile from the 57 recoilless rifle missed his vehicle and exploded against a rubber tree. Corporal Carter returned fire using his .50 calibre machine gun. The gun jammed. He then grasped the driver's Owen Machine Carbine and without hesitation leapt onto the top of his vehicle and returned fire killing the 57 millimetre recoilless rifle team a fraction after another 57 millimetre recoilless rifle round had been fire. This round exploded and dazed the crew and passengers. Corporal Carter still undeterred continued to fire killing five other enemy.

By his actions Corporal Carter also drew additional fire onto himself enabling the other vehicles of the Troop to advance.

Through the action which was fought at very close range, Corporal Carter showed outstanding courage, initiative and determination. His actions were an inspiration to all his comrades and contributed greatly to the success of the assault by the relief force, the heavy casualties inflicted on the enemy, and immediately afterwards, the relief of D Company, 6th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment.

 

Army Number: 214099

Substantive Rank: Corporal

Christian Name: Eric John

Surname: COLLINS

Honour or Award: MID   

Corporal Collins enlisted in the Australian Regular Army on the 8 June 1961 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He arrived in South Vietnam to join A Squadron 3rd Cavalry Regiment on 12 September 1967 

On Operation Pinaroo in March 1968, a vehicle in Corporal Collins' section was damaged by rocket fire and the crew wounded. Corporal Collins immediately brought his own vehicle forward to an exposed position to engage the enemy and provide covering fire whilst the injured crewman was rescued

On Operation Toan Thang in May 1968, a vehicle in Corporal Collins' section detonated an anti-tank mine and the crew commander was wounded. There were no engineers present so Corporal Collins operated the mine detector to clear the area for the medical evacuation helicopter. Disregarding his personal safety he then swept the area of the mine crater and discovered a second mine. His prompt actions, personal courage, initiative and leadership enabled the safe evacuation of the casualty. 

During a land clearing operation in August 1968, Corporal Collins was escorting a bulldozer which detonated an anti-tank mine wounding two engineers. Corporal Collins immediately secured the area and personally supervised the evacuation of the wounded.

Corporal Collins has consistently shown that he is a cool, quick thinking NCO who has shown above average qualities of initiative, courage and leadership. His action whilst in contact with the enemy has been an inspiration to other members of his Troop.

   

Army Number: 27881

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Charles Stewart St Andrew

Surname: CONNOR

Honour or Award: MID

Major Charles Stewart St Andrew Connor graduated from the Officer Cadet School Portsea in December 1953. He served in various staff and regimental appointments in Australia and overseas and on 28 October 1969 he joined the Australian Army Training Team in Vietnam.

Major Connor served as an Assistant Province Military Adviser to the Chief of Territorial Forces in Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam from 28 October 1969 to 29 October 1970. During this assignment Major Connor was responsible for the co-ordination between Province Regional and Popular Force units, and United States and Army of the Republic of Vietnam units operating together in joint areas of operations within Quang Tri Province. He was also responsible for the defence of the Quang Tri Military Assistance Command Vietnam compound in Quang Tri.

In 1970 the enemy forces consisting of North Vietnamese Army and Viet Cong main force units made repeated attempts to infiltrate the coastal lowlands in an effort to re-establish the Viet Cong Infrastructure and thereby disrupt the government of Vietnam Pacification Program. Major Connor participated on all operations directed towards preventing this enemy infiltration and his untiring efforts and sound tactical ability assisted significantly in the defeat of the enemy force.

During the period July to September 1970 North Vietnamese Army and Viet Cong units made three concerted attempts to capture the Hai Lan District Headquarters and surrounding villages. On each occasion the enemy employed elements of two Battalions. Major Connor played a major part in the conduct of the battles and on each occasion his actions contributed significantly to the resounding defeats inflicted on the enemy. During this period he was also instrumental in the organisation and conduct of a small team of Regional Force troops who fought their way through an area held by an enemy force of superior strength, to relieve two United States Army advisers, thereby averting a situation which almost certainly would have resulted in the deaths of these advisers.

Throughout this period of continuous operations Major Connor's devotion to duty, courage under fire and high professional standards earned the highest respect of all his Vietnamese, American and Australian associates and reflects great credit on himself, the Australian Army Training Team in Vietnam and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 38619

Substantive Rank: Second Lieutenant

Christian Name: John Frederick

Surname: CROSSMAN

Honour or Award: MID

Second Lieutenant John Crossman graduated from the Officer Cadet School, Portsea on 1 1 June 1966 and was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined A Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment in South Vietnam in January 1968.

He commenced his tour of duty as a Troop officer and then later became the Squadron intelligence and liaison officer. An extremely dedicated and competent young officer he approached all his responsibilities in a most professional manner.

As Squadron intelligence officer Second lieutenant Crossman was very thorough in the performance of his duties and constantly sought ways and means to improve his knowledge. On several occasions he successfully devised new ambush techniques for cavalry, which he personally put into practice.

During Operations Harvest, Capital and Goodwood between October 1968 and January 1969, he was deployed as a liaison officer with the United States Army units working in support of the Australian Task Force. His exemplary conduct, bearing, manner, cooperation and grasp of military affairs at all times enabled him to be held in the highest regard by the Allied units to which he was attached.

In all respects an outstanding young officer, Second Lieutenant Crossman set a fine example to his fellow officers and to the men who served under him.

 

Army Number: 215419

Substantive Rank: Corporal

Temporary Rank: Sergeant

Christian Name: David William

Surname: DAVIES

Honour or Award: MID

Sergeant David William Davies enlisted into the Australian Regular Army on 26 February 1963, and was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined B Squadron 3rd Cavalry Regiment in South Vietnam on 3 December 1969.

On 18 February 1970, the Cavalry Section Sergeant Davies was commanding was moving along a jungle trail at the base of the Long Hai mountains when it made contact with the enemy. Sergeant Davies' armoured personnel carrier was hit and penetrated by an enemy anti-tank rocket. The driver was seriously wounded. Although Sergeant Davies himself received a serious wound to his foot and the enemy was still in the area, he removed the driver from the driver's scat and drove the damaged armoured personnel carrier out of the danger area. Sergeant Davies discovered at this time that his radio had been damaged. Without considering his own injuries, he ran to another carrier and organised counter fire against the enemy. As a result of this fire, the enemy quickly withdrew.

Throughout the incident, Sergeant Davies displayed calmness, courage, presence of mind and leadership which were a credit to himself, to his Regiment and to the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 42463

Substantive Rank: Lieutenant

Temporary Rank; Captain

Christian Name. Ramon

Surname. DE VERE

Honour or Award: MC

Captain Ramon De Vere was commissioned from the ranks on 15 June 1966, and was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined 3rd Cavalry Regiment in South Vietnam on 7 January 1969.

Captain De Vere has commanded a cavalry Troop for ten months and has been in many actions against the enemy. In the month of February during the TET offensive, his Troop was deployed as part of the Task Force Ready Reaction Force. On 18 February, his Troop took part in an attack to dislodge an enemy force from the village of Long Dien. On the night 22, 23 February his Troop was involved in actions when the enemy attacked the Province Capital Baria. In both these actions, Captain De Vere displayed a high standard of professionalism and personal courage.

On 6 June 1969, he commanded a combined force, consisting of a tank Troop and his own Troop, against a strong enemy force in the village of Binh Ba. In this action, he displayed complete calmness and control whilst under fire. His personal actions and orders significantly contributed to the defeat of the enemy. On 7 and A June 1969, his Troop redeployed to the village of Long Dien where once again they performed creditably.

On 5 August 1969, Captain De Vere sited his Troop in ambush positions on the coast near the Nui Tam Bo hills. One of the ambush points was sprung against a party of twenty five of the enemy. The subsequent actions of his Troop at night resulted in fifteen of the enemy being killed.

On these and many other occasions, Captain De Vere displayed above average leadership qualities. He moulded his Troop into a proficient fighting force and his personal efforts and the excellent performance of his troop are a credit to him and a fine example of all.

 

Army Number: 335157

Substantive Rank: Captain

Christian Name: Rodney Michael

Surname: EARLE

Honour or Award: MID

Captain Rodney Earle graduated from the Military College on 9 December 1964, and was allotted to The Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined B Squadron 3rd Cavalry Regiment in South Vietnam on 24 September 1970. He continued to serve with A Squadron 3rd Cavalry Regiment from 7 January 1971.

On arrival in South Vietnam Captain Earle was appointed to command Ist Troop and has continued in that capacity. Immediately after his arrival, Captain Earle was deployed on operations and has been on operations constantly since then.

By an excellent display of devotion to duty, practical and theoretical knowledge, and the finest qualities of leadership, he has welded his Troop into an extremely effective and professional group. During his period of command, his Troop has accounted for 57 enemy killed or captured.

In all matters pertaining to command and control of his troop, Captain Earle has shown a high degree of skill and initiative which reflect great credit upon himself, his Regiment and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 52989

Substantive Rank: Sergeant

Christian Name: John William

Surname; FOGARTY

Honour or Award: MID

 

Sergeant John Fogarty enlisted in the Australian Regular Army on 12 September 1955 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He was posted to 3rd Cavalry Regiment in May 1967 and arrived in South Vietnam to join A Squadron in December 1967.

On all occasions when he has been in contact with the enemy he has displayed above average ability to overcome hazardous situations.

On 1 March 1968 when his troop was employed to assist in clearing an enemy force from Baria, Sergeant Fogarty's armoured personnel carrier was hit by an enemy rocket and caught fire. The ammunition in the carrier commenced to explode but Sergeant Fogarty remained inside the vehicle until he was sure that all troops aboard it had escaped.

In the period May to June 1968 Sergeant Fogarty was at Fire Support Base Coral when it sustained numerous heavy mortar and rocket attacks. During these attacks Sergeant Fogarty displayed exceptional coolness under fire when lie repeatedly exposed himself to cheek the safety of his own Troop and to determine the direction of the enemy attacks. In July 1968, on operations, a vehicle in his section was mined causing one fatal and several other casualties. Although the area was being swept by enemy fire Sergeant Fogarty successfully extracted the casualties and his section from the area.

On these and all other actions, the high degree of personal bravery, leadership initiative and coolness under fire shown by Sergeant Fogarty reflected great credit upon himself and provided an excellent example to all.

 

Army Number: 1200180

Substantive Rank: Corporal

Christian Name: Garry John

Surname: G0TT

Honour or Award: MID

Corporal Garry Gott enlisted into the Australian Regular Army in April 1964. He first served in Vietnam with A Squadron, 3nd Cavalry Regiment in 1966. He joined B Squadron, lst Armoured Regiment in Vietnam on 6 August 1969.

On 18 February 1970, Corporal Gott's Troop was part of an all arms group operating with C Company, 8th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment which made contact with the enemy in a heavily fortified bunker system in the Long Hai hills. During the initial fire fight, an armoured personnel carrier was hit by rocket propelled grenades from close range, its crew and passengers wounded, and the vehicle started to burn.

Corporal Gott, moved his tank to within ten yards of the enemy occupied bunker system in order to recover the still burning armoured personnel and rescue the wounded crew.

Whilst still in a position to receive enemy fire, Corporal Gott and his radio operator dismounted from the tank. They attached a tow rope from the armoured personnel carrier to the tank, remounted their vehicle and attempted to tow the armoured personnel carrier into a safe area. When the tow rope disengaged from the armoured personnel carrier, Corporal Gott and his operator dismounted in order to secure it again. During this attempt, the armoured personnel carrier exploded as Corporal Gott was four feet away and he was wounded. The explosion totally destroyed the armoured personnel carrier and killed the crew. Corporal Gott, realising that there was no point in further risking his crew and vehicle, directed his vehicle back out of the contact area, firing as he went.

Corporal Gott displayed outstanding courage, leadership and selflessness reflecting credit upon himself, his Regiment and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 253

Substantive Rank: Brigadier

Christian Name: Stuart Clarence

Surname: GRAHAM

Honour or Award: DSO

Brigadier Stuart Clarence Graham graduated from the Royal Military College Duntroon in August 1940 in the Royal Australian Armoured Corps.

In January 1967 he was appointed Commander lst Australian Task Force which was deployed on active service in Phuoc Tuy Province in South Vietnam. He successfully planned and executed operations which have led to large areas of the Province being pacified and re-established. This was accomplished despite unfavourable conditions of terrain and weather, plus operational and logistical problems of considerable magnitude which demanded his constant attention.

During his tour as Commander he personally directed and controlled the operations of the Task Force in Phuoc Tuy Province with Conspicuous success. His able and personal direction was a major factor in the very successful engagements which his Task Force had with the Viet Cong.

Throughout his period of command of the Task Force his professional skill and leadership has been outstanding and he has continued to develop the excellent relations enjoyed with the Allied Formations with which the Task Force is associated.

His consideration of his men without thought for himself and his outstanding personal example have been an inspiration to those under his command.

 

Army Number: 57040

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Kevin

Surname: GURNEY

Honour or Award: MID

Major Kevin Gurney graduated from the Royal Military College in December 1954 and after staff and regimental appointments in Australia and overseas arrived in South Vietnam in January 1968 to assume the appointment of Deputy Assistant Quartermaster General, Headquarters lst Australian Task Force.

As the Deputy Assistant Quartermaster General, Major Gumey displayed a professional competence well above the ordinary. He coordinated the several service agencies and organised and controlled the logistic support of all units of the Task Force in such an efficient and capable manner that the units were never without those stores and supplies needed. The reliability of the resupply system of the Task Force was such that Commanders and staff of the Task Force units have complete confidence in their logistic support.

Major Gurney was primarily responsible for the successful development of the technique involved in the forward maintenance of the Task Force when it first operated outside Phuoc Tuy Province, a technique not previously required in this theatre.

Major Gurney's professional competence and his devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the Australian Army.

Army Number. 52202

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Richard John Godfrey

Surname: HALL

Honour or Award: MID. Now upgraded to Medal for Gallantry (MG)

Major Richard John Godfrey Hall graduated from the Officer Cadet School in 1953. He served in various staff and regimental appointments before being appointed Deputy Assistant Quarter Master General of Headquarters 1 Australian Logistic Support Group in Vietnam in September 1970.

In his appointment, Major Hall was responsible for the executive co-ordination of receipt of logistic requirements from the United States logistic system, from Australia and from other sources, by sea, road and air. He co-ordinated the provision of services and distribution of requirements of all natures to 1 Australian Task Force, to other Australian Army formations and Units and some requirements to the Royal Australian Air Force in Vietnam.

Major Hall established a close personal relationship with senior United States Commanders and staff officers responsible for supply to the Australian logistic system. Despite the different and rapidly changing procedures of the United States system, he ensured a steady flow of routine requirements and a quick response at any time to operationally urgent demands.

In handling requirements from Australian and other overseas sources of supply, he successfully co-operated with officers of the Royal Australian Navy and the Royal Australian Air Force and with executives of civilian firms working under contract.

Major Hall personally co-ordinated the administrative movement of Australian units arriving in and departing from Vietnam. He also co-ordinated the logistic operations of six major and seven minor logistic units at 1 Australian Logistic Support Group to ensure that demands for logistic services and supplies were promptly and efficiently fulfilled.

The personal efforts of Major Hall provided an example which was emulated by other officers in units and on the staff. The success achieved in logistic operations was largely attributable to his skill, dedication and unremitting attention to his task over a period of twelve months and was a credit to himself, his Corps and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 1203040

Substantive Rank: Trooper

Christian Name: Daniel John

Surname: HANDLEY

Honour or Award: MID Now upgraded to Medal for Gallantry (MG)

Trooper Daniel John Handley enlisted in the Australian Army on 6 January 1970, and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined B Squadron, 3rd Calvary Regiment in South Vietnam on 22 October 1970, and continued to serve with A Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment from 7 January 1971. On 12 June 197 1, the Troop in which Trooper Handley was serving reacted to a contact with the enemy. On deployment, this Troop came under enemy fire from several areas and the armoured personnel carrier which Trooper Handley was driving was struck by anti-tank projectiles, badly wounding the crew commander jamming the turret. Trooper Handley was also wounded in this engagement.

On realising that his crew commander was wounded, Trooper Handley left his position, removed the commander from the turret, placed him on the side of the vehicle away from enemy fire and rendered first aid. He then returned to the turret and engaged the enemy with machine gun fire. Trooper Handley left the turret to render additional first aid and then again continued to engage the enemy until his vehicle was recovered. Trooper Handley and the crew Commander were subsequently evacuated. Displaying cool courage and competence, Trooper Handley behaved in an exemplary manner which are qualities he continued to display during his tour and reflect great credit upon himself, his Regiment and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number-. 51407

Temporary Rank: Captain

Christian Name; Robert Keith

Surname: HILL

Honour or Award. MC

Captain Hill has commanded lst Armoured Personnel Carrier Troop of the Prince of Wales Light Horse since the arrival of the unit in South Vietnam in June 1965.

In addition to supporting lst Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment, to which the Troop is attached, Captain Hill's unit has participated in a number of operations under command of the American D16 Armour of 173 Airborne Brigade (Separate), It was during one of these joint operations, on the night of 28 June 1965, that Captain Hill distinguished himself in a display of conspicuous gallantry.

While in a defensive position at the abandoned hamlet of Phuoc Loc in War Zone D, an attempt to infiltrate Captain Hill's Troop perimeter was made at about 2200 hours. Captain Hill rushed to the point of contact and assisted in repulsing the Viet Cong by throwing hand grenades. During this action, he repeatedly exposed himself to fire and was wounded in the right side, Although in great pain, he refused to be evacuated and continued to direct the efforts of his men during the action and for the remainder of the night. He was finally evacuated at approximately 0900 hours the next morning.

His bravery inspired those around him and was singularly instrumental in preventing the enemy from penetrating the tenuous position. Captain Hill's actions on the night of 28 June 1965 are indicative of the service he has rendered since coming to South Vietnam and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

 

Army Number: 1733339

Substantive Rank: Lance Corporal

Christian Name: David John

Surname: IZATT

Honour or Award: MID

Lance Corporal David Izatt, a National Serviceman, commenced his military service on 12 July 1967, and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined A Squadron, 3rd Calvary Regiment in South Vietnam in October 1968 and was transferred to B Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment in May 1969.

On 18 January 1969 during Operation Goodwood, Lance Corporal Izatt was the crew Commander of the lead vehicle in an armoured personnel carrier section conducting a resupply mission for an infantry company. At approximately 1143 hours, the Section Commander's vehicle, which was moving behind Corporal Izatt's vehicle, detonated a large anti-tank mine. The detonation severely damaged the armoured personnel carrier, fatally wounded the crew Commander and seriously wounded the other five occupants of the vehicle.

Corporal Izatt reacted immediately and organised his own crew and the attached engineer element to secure the area from possible enemy action and to check it for any further mines. He then calmly organised assistance to the wounded and their evacuation by air. All these events took place in a very rapid space of time. With this completed he then proceeded to organise the recovery of the damaged carrier.

Corporal Izatt, by his presence of mind, reacted immediately to master a confusing situation. Despite his inexperience, his was an above average performance under adverse conditions and his personal conduct set an example to all.

 

Army Number: 3793246

Substantive Rank: Second lieutenant

Christian Name. Graeme Victor

Surname: JONES

Honour or Award. MID

Second Lieutenant Graeme Victor Jones graduated from the Officer Training Unit, on 19 July 1968 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined A Squadron, lst Armoured Regiment and arrived in South Vietnam, on 28 January 1970.

On 21 May 1970 at about 1400 hours Second Lieutenant Jones was the Commander of a force consisting of a tank troop, a cavalry section and an infantry Platoon which was directed to assault an occupied enemy bunker complex.

Second Lieutenant Jones gave orders for his Troop to form into assault formation and an immediate attack was launched. The enemy position was a strong one and heavy fire was directed by the enemy against the attacking force causing casualties to the infantry Platoon and cavalry section. Rocket propelled grenade fire penetrated one of the three tanks wounding two of the crew. Second Lieutenant Jones continued to fight his and the other remaining tank in an aggressive manner against the strong enemy position. Although outnumbered this aggressiveness combined with the superior firepower of the tanks caused the enemy to withdraw.

His coolness under fire and his determined leadership contributed greatly towards the defeat of an enemy which was strongly entrenched and which outnumbered the attacking team.

Throughout his tour with A Squadron, 1st Armoured Regiment, Second lieutenant Jones has on several occasions displayed similar attributes. These, combined with his cheerfulness and co-operative spirit reflect great credit upon himself, his Regiment and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 235055

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Dimitri Richard

Surname: KEPPER

Honour or Award: MID

Major Dimitri Richard Kepper was commissioned on 9 December 1953. He has served in a number of regimental, staff and training appointments within Australia and overseas. He was posted as the Grade Two General Staff Officer (Operations) at Headquarters Australian Force Vietnam and assumed this duty on 20 May 1967.

Major Kepper's duties have required him to personally advise and brief the Force Commander and members of the staff on all matter pertaining to operations. This task has required Major Kepper to remain constantly alert to all aspects of operations involving the Australian Force Vietnam. Major Kepper has shown an outstanding ability to appreciate, forecast, collate and record operations. In order to achieve this capacity he has revised reporting procedures, instituted new monitoring systems and worked extremely long hours. Major Kepper has also been responsible for requesting changes to unit organisations for the Force. This and his other duties have required him to liaise with his American counterparts on many occasions. His tact and experience has enabled him to establish a rapport with these Allied officers who appreciate his professional outlook.

In all aspects of his duties and in the co-ordination and supervision of the General Staff branch Major Kepper has shown great enthusiasm and determination.

By his selfless devotion to duty and determination Major Kepper has performed his duties in such a manner as to reflect great credit upon himself and the Australian Regular Army.

Army Number: 235100

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: John David

Surname: KELDIE

Honour or Award: MC

Major John Keldie graduated from the Royal Military College Duntroon in December 1956. After various staff and regimental appointments in Australia and advanced armoured training in England and Germany, Major Keldie assumed the command of A Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment on 18 February 1968.

Major Keldie's service with A Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment has been an outstanding example of fine leadership both in and out of battle. The consistently excellent performance of his unit under arduous and hazardous circumstances has been largely the result of his drive, determination and sound judgement.

During May 1968, the Task Force was deployed to intercept strong enemy forces advancing towards Saigon. In its offensive operations from its Fire Support Bases Coral and Balmoral, the Task Force continually encountered heavy and determined enemy opposition. In all these operations Major Keldie's Squadron contributed to a marked degree to the successes the Task Force gained in inflicting severe losses on the enemy.

In the early hours of darkness on 15 May 1968, the enemy attacked Fire Support Base Coral with three Battalions over a period of four hours, before being repulsed by the defenders. Throughout this attack Major Keldie manoeuvred his Squadron to reinforce threatened sections, personally organised and directed his armoured personnel carriers in the resupply of troops becoming short of ammunition and in the evacuation of casualties from the forward defences. Throughout the attacks he remained in an exposed position under heavy mortar and rocket fire in order to command his troops and direct them.

His unfailing energy, determination, and personal courage in this and other operations have been in the finest traditions of the service and have brought credit on himself and the Royal Australian Armoured Corps.

 

Army Number: 43040

Substantive Rank: Sergeant

Christian Name: Grantly Michael

Surname. KEMBLE

Honour or Award: MID

Sergeant Grantly Michael Kemble enlisted in the Australian Regular Army on 14 March 1962, and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He arrived in South Vietnam to join his Squadron on 11 June 1970.

On 30 December 1970, Sergeant Kemble was commanding a section of APCs in support of a rifle platoon operating in the Phuoc Bu area, when the rifle platoon became heavily engaged with an enemy company group in a bunker system. Sergeant Kemble, who was some distance from the contact area, quickly assessed the situation and without hesitation led his section through thick and close country to the contact area where he came immediately into action. His prompt action forced the enemy to withdraw from the right flank of the contact area and greatly relieved the pressure on the rifle platoon. He then picked up the four badly wounded, moved to the nearest clearing and secured the area so that a helicopter could evacuate the wounded.

His coolness and initiative were conspicuous throughout the whole action, and reflect great credit upon himself, his Squadron and the Royal Australian Armoured Corps.

 

Army Number: 37178

Substantive Rank: Sergeant

Christian Name: Edmund Sidney

Surname: LEVY

Honour or Award: DCM

Sergeant Edmund Sidney Levy enlisted in the Australian Army on 4 May 1961 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined B Squadron, 3rd Calvary Regiment in South Vietnam on 2 September 1970.

Early in the morning of 31. December 1970, a large enemy group entered an ambush area south-east of Xuyen Moc. The ambush was initiated by Sergeant Levy at precisely the right moment and for the next three hours he calmly and resolutely directed the fire of his section of three armoured personnel carriers. The fire from his small force was so effective that 21 enemy were killed and subsequent intelligence showed that many more were wounded.

On the evening of 7 January 1971, Sergeant Levy was commanding his section in an ambush position near the Horseshoe feature. When an enemy group approached his position, Sergeant Levy initiated the ambush which resulted in three enemy killed and one prisoner captured.

At 2210 hours on 21 June 1971, Sergeant Levy was again commanding his section in an ambush position in southern Long Khan Province when an enemy group approached from the west. Contact was initiated on Sergeant Levy's order and continued until 0400 hours the following morning resulting in twelve enemy killed and three prisoners captured.

On all occasions Sergeant Levy's calmness, resolution and sound judgement enabled his section to inflict heavy casualties on the enemy. He displayed exemplary conduct and leadership of the highest order which were a credit to himself, his Regiment and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 216883

Rank: Corporal

Christian Name: Ronald Charles

Surname: MACEY

Award: MM

On 18 February 1970, during Operation Hammersley in the Long Hai Hills, Phuoc Tuy Province, a company of infantry mounted in armoured personnel carriers was engaged by heavy enemy anti-tank and small arms fire. One armoured personnel carrier was hit by two anti-tank rounds, severely damaging it and causing it to catch fire. Attempts by other armoured personnel carriers to recover it, failed because of heavy enemy anti-tank fire. Two crew members and five soldiers were trapped in the crippled and burning vehicle.

Corporal Macey and Lance Corporal Coe who were travelling in an adjacent armoured personnel carrier, saw the plight of the soldiers trapped in the burning carrier and despite heavy small arms and grenade fire from enemy bunkers, dismounted in full view of the enemy and ran to the disabled vehicle. Together they forced open the heavy rear door of the carrier and with complete disregard for their own safety, Corporal Macey and Lance Corporal Coe rescued the five trapped soldiers and their weapons. All five, two of whom were unable to move, were in a dazed and shocked condition and had to be led or carried to safety.

Corporal Macey and Lance Corporal Coe again ran to the burning carrier, intending to rescue the two trapped crew members. In the face of increased enemy small arms fire being directed at the disabled vehicle, their task had become even more hazardous. As they reached the burning carrier, a satchel charge exploded making the recovery of the crewmen impossible.

Corporal Macey and Lance Corporal Coe by their immediate actions undoubtedly saved the lives of the five passengers in the disabled carrier. Their courage and complete disregard for their own safety was an inspiration to all and reflects great credit on themselves and on the Australian Army.

 

Army Number. 3792771

Substantive Rank: Lance Corporal

Christian Name: Peter Joseph

Surname: MOORE

Honour or Award. MID

Lance Corporal Peter Moore enlisted as a National Serviceman on 2 October 1968. He was posted to the let Armoured Regiment on 4 March 1969 and joined B Squadron, lst Armoured Regiment in South Vietnam on 9 December 1969.

On 18 February 1970, Lance Corporal Moore's troop was part of an all arms group operating with C Company, 8th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment which made contact with enemy in a heavily fortified bunker system in the Long Hai Hills. During the initial fire fight, an armoured personnel carrier was hit by rocket propelled grenades from close range, its crew and passengers wounded, and the vehicle started to burn.

Lance Corporal Moore's tank moved up close to the damaged armoured personnel carrier in an attempt to rescue the wounded crew and recover the carrier. Lance Corporal Moore dismounted with his crew Commander and covered by the gunner of the tank, they moved forward to the armoured personnel carrier which was five yards from two enemy bunkers, carrying a tow rope from their tank and attached it to the armoured personnel carrier. They remounted and began to tow the burning vehicle to a safe area. The tow rope slipped from the armoured personnel carrier and they again dismounted in order to secure the tow rope. During this attempt the carrier exploded as Lance Corporal Moore and his Crew Commander were four feet from it. The explosion totally destroyed the armoured personnel carrier and killed the crew.

By his courageous actions, Lance Corporal Moore displayed courage and determination, in the face of enemy fire and the obvious dangers from the burning vehicle which reflect credit upon himself, his Regiment and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 47015

Substantive Rank:. Major

Christian Name: Gordon James

Surname: MURPHY

Honour or Award: MID

Major Gordon Murphy graduated from the Royal Military College, Duntroon, on 14 December 1955, and after regimental and staff appointments in Australia and overseas, arrived in South Vietnam in February 1967 as Officer Commanding A Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment.

Major Murphy led his Squadron during 12 months of operations in Vietnam. During this period his unit took part in all Task Force operations; carrying infantry into battle, fighting as armoured vehicles, providing alternative communications, escorting convoys and casualty evacuation under fire.

At all times Major Murphy's planning co-ordination and supervision were of the highest order. On many occasions he exercised his command responsibilities in the face of enemy fire without regard for his own safety. His aggressive attitude and sound tactics made his unit a most effective force, and one to be very seriously reckoned with by the enemy.

Major Murphy's unit was continuously committed to operations, in whole or in part, for the whole of his tour. His command involved long and arduous hours in the field and continuous planning for future operations; a task which he did with drive and enthusiasm.

Major Murphy contributed directly to the operational successes of lst Australian Task Force. His professionalism, devotion to duty and courageous leadership, reflect great credit on himself, his Regiment and the Australian Regular Army.

 

Army Number: 36906

Substantive Rank: Sergeant

Christian Name: John Patrick

Surname: MURPHY

Honour or Award: MID

Sergeant John Murphy enlisted in the Australian Regular Army on 28 March 1960 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined 3rd Cavalry Regiment in November 1966 and arrived in South Vietnam to join A Squadron in April 1967.

During his tour he acted as Troop Sergeant as well as Section Commander of 3rd troop, A Squadron, and in both capacities his enthusiasm, commonsense and efficiency were exemplary. Sergeant Murphy took part in many operations, and very early earned the reputation for hold leadership and skilful tactics. When working with other Arms and Allies his unusual ability to establish pleasant relations made for close and harmonious co-operation, not only with his section and Troop, but for the Squadron as a whole.

On 1 February 1968 as it member of 3rd Troop A Squadron, Sergeant Murphy assisted in the defence of Sector Headquarters in Baria, Phuoc Tuy Province.

Twice during the battle Sergeant Murphy assumed command of 3rd Troop, firstly when his Commander's vehicle was knocked out and secondly when his Commander was later wounded. On both these occasions the Troop was under fire and in difficulties. Nevertheless, with great professional skill and judgement, he continued the action, organised the evacuation of Australian and American casualties, and also the recovery of a damaged armoured personnel carrier. His coolness under fire and his personal courage when he dismounted to connect tow ropes to a disabled carrier steadied and encouraged his Troop and contributed greatly to the success in this action.

Throughout his tour in Vietnam Sergeant Murphy showed initiative, professional skill, leadership and personal courage of a high order, which reflect great credit on his Regiment and the Australian Regular Army.

 

Army Number: 36432

Substantive Rank: Lieutenant

Temporary Rank: Captain

Christian Name. Peter John

Surname: MURPHY

Honour or Award: MID

Captain Peter John Murphy enlisted in the Australian Military Forces on 12 January 1956 and was appointed to a commission in the Royal Australian Armoured Corps on 1 March 1967. He arrived in South Vietnam to join B Squadron 3rd Calvary Regiment on 7 January 1970.

For most of 1970, Captain Murphy and his Troop of armoured personnel carriers have supported 7th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment on operations. Throughout the period Captain Murphy has set a high example of personal bravery coupled with excellent judgement and quick decision. On one occasion when commanding his troop in the field, his own armoured personnel carrier detonated an enemy mine, which badly damaged the carrier, caused several casualties and threw Captain Murphy bodily around the vehicle. He then continued with coolness and fortitude to command his Troop from another vehicle.

He has personally led many patrols and ambushes into enemy base areas resulting in contact and casualties to the enemy. His troop has performed with outstanding success due largely to the leadership and example of Captain Murphy.

His actions reflect great credit upon himself, his Squadron, the Royal Australian Armoured Corps and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 57033

Substantive Rank: Major

Temporary Rank: Lieutenant Colonel

Christian Name: Laurence George

Surname: O'DONNELL

Honour or Award: MID

Major Laurie O'Donnell graduated from the Royal Military College, Duntroon on 15 December 1954 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. After various appointments in Australia and overseas he was appointed General Staff Officer Grade Two (Operations) at Headquarters, Australian Force Vietnam and subsequently assumed command of A Squadron, 3rd Calvary Regiment on 17 September 1968.

Throughout nine months of continuous operations, Major O'Donnell maintained his Squadron at a high standard of efficiency and participated in a wide range of successful operations. These varied from convoy escort and route clearance to ambushes and the insertion of Special Air Service patrols.

In addition to commanding his Squadron, Major O'Donnell had the added responsibility of defence commander for the Task Force headquarters when it was deployed. This involved much detailed and exacting work in the early stages of each redeployment and was always accomplished without prejudice to his other responsibilities.

Major O'Donnell displayed unfailing energy, fine leadership and a highly professional ability. His command of A Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment throughout this period of intense activity was exemplary.

 

Army Number: 17050

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Kenneth Roy

Surname: PHILLIPS

Honour or Award: MID

Major Phillips graduated from the Royal Military College in 1957 and served with the Royal Australian Armoured Corps in a number of regimental, staff and training appointments before joining the Australian Army Training Team in Vietnam in May 1970.

In August 1970 Major Phillips was appointed to command the Training Team advisers, in Phuoc Tuy Province. In addition he had the task of advising the Phuoc Tuy Province Chief on all matters affecting Vietnamese Territorial Forces and was directly responsible to the United States Province Senior Adviser. By his hard work, devotion to duty and professional competence Major Phillips was able to establish himself as an expert in the field of Territorial Forces. His opinions and advice were sought by senior officers and resulted in a definite improvement in the capabilities of the Territorial Forces in Phuoc Tuy Province.

Major Phillips' professional ability and leadership during his tour with the Training Team have been outstanding. He has earned the highest praise and respect from all those with whom he served. His achievements reflect great credit on himself, the Australian Army Training Team and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number.. 42352

Substantive Rank. Sergeant

Temporary Rank: Warrant Officer Class Two

Christian Name; Thomas Dudley

Surname. PHILLIPS

Honour or Award: MID (Posthumous)

Warrant Officer Thomas Dudley Phillips enlisted in the Australian Regular Army in June 1959 after previously serving for several years in the British Army. He then served continuously with the lst Armoured Regiment at Puckapunyal until posted to the Australian Army Training team in October 1965, and assigned as an adviser to Regional Force units in the central Vietnamese Province of Quang Ngai.

On 18 March 1966, Warrant Officer Phillips was the adviser with the 423rd Regional Force Company on an operation in an area approximately 15 kilometres south of Quang Ngai City. He was accompanied by Warrant Officer John Neville Selmes, who was advising another Regional Force Company, and three United States Army Lieutenants. At 0810 hours both forces were engaged by a significantly superior Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Regular Force and a vicious fire fight ensued at close range. After approximately fifteen minutes all the Regional Force troops, with the exception of their Company Commanders, abandoned the position leaving the advisers to oppose the enemy alone and personal weapons only available since requests for artillery and air support had been refused.

At this point, whilst the group of advisers was attempting to withdraw, one of the US Lieutenants was wounded and Warrant Officer Selmes went to his assistance. While Selmes assisted the wounded officer to a safer position, Warrant Officer Phillips continuously exposed himself to heavy enemy fire in order to engage the enemy effectively and cover his comrades' movement. This enabled the wounded officer to be taken to a rear ward position from which support could again be called.

While Warrant Officer Phillips was providing covering fire and successfully impeding the enemy's' approach he was seriously wounded in the stomach by a burst of automatic fire. He was seen to stumble but nevertheless recovered and continued to give fire support until he could no longer stand. After his subsequent recovery by the remaining advisers and as a result of these wounds, he died in hospital on the morning of 20 March 1966.

During this engagement all the advisers were wounded. By his courageous action, both before and after being wounded, Warrant Officer Phillips enabled the remainder to reorganise their position and eventually arrange evacuation for the whole party, Warrant Officer Phillips sacrificed his life in this endeavour and his conduct was in the highest Australian tradition of courage and professional dedication.

 

Army Number: 2785969

Substantive Rank: Lance Corporal

Christian Name: Peter Francis Joseph

Surname: PURCELL

Honour or Award: MID

Lance Corporal Peter Purcell, a National Serviceman, commenced his military service on 1 February 1967, and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined 3rd Cavalry Regiment in June 1967, and arrived in South Vietnam to join A Squadron in April 1968.

In August 1968, during street fighting in Long Dien in Phuoc Tuy Province, several soldiers of l st Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment were wounded. Lance Corporal Purcell was asked by the infantry to collect the wounded in his carrier. While moving forward, his vehicle was engaged by enemy rocket and small arms fire. Lance Corporal Purcell returned fire and in spite of enemy ground fire he continued to move his vehicle forward and made several halts to collect all the wounded infantrymen. He then turned his vehicle about and withdrew through the enemy fire to take the wounded to safety. His coolness and personal courage in advancing in the face of enemy fire to rescue the wounded were of great reassurance to the infantry he was supporting.

 

Army Number: 5410984

Substantive Rank: Corporal

Substantive Rank; Sergeant

Christian Name: Michael Reginald

Surname: RAINEY

Award. MM

Corporal Michael Rainey enlisted in the Australian Regular Army on 21 December 1960 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined C Squadron, lst Armoured Regiment in October 1967 and arrived in South Vietnam with 3 Troop of the Squadron in April 1968.

On 22 August 1968, during Operation Nowra, Corporal Rainey was a tank crew Commander with 3 Troop when the Troop was sent into Long Dien with an infantry Company, to clear it of enemy.

At approximately 1025 hours, Corporal Rainey's tank came under small arms and anti-tank rocket fire from both sides. Because of the narrowness of the road, 3 Troop was able to advance only in line ahead formation with Corporal Rainey's tank leading and receiving heavy fire. Despite this he continued to advance, returning the enemy fire and destroying several strong points. In the face of his accurate fire the enemy commenced to withdraw.

A running battle then commenced which lasted for six hours during which Corporal Rainey continued to lead the advance. During this period his tank suffered a gunnery failure which limited his ability to return fire. He continued to advance firing his machine gun only until, after an hour, he was able to rectify the fault. In the course of the battle Cpl Rainey's tank was constantly under fire and was twice hit by rockets.

By his sustained and res(plute action he greatly contributed to the speed of the advance and the rout of the enemy. His disregard for his own personal safety and his leadership of his crew were an inspiration to the remainder of the Troop and showed a standard of sustained courage which reflects great credit upon himself and his Regiment.

 

Army Number. 42924

Substantive Rank: Sergeant

Temporary Rank: Warrant Officer Class Two

Christian Name: Kenneth Alfred

Surname: RICHARDS

Honour or Award: MM

Warrant Officer Richards enlisted in the Australian Regular Army on 29 October 1957, and after recruit training was posted to First Armoured Regiment, Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He volunteered for service in South Vietnam and was posted to the Australian Army Training Team on 6 December 1966, where he was allotted as an adviser to 3rd Troop 7th Cavalry Squadron, Army of the Republic of Vietnam.

On 7 September 1967 in Thua Thien Province, 3rd Troop was ordered to capture a heavily armed, well entrenched enemy position in a village, consisting of two regular Viet Cong companies. Warrant Officer Class Two Richards occupied the Armoured Personnel Carrier spearheading the assault, which was supported by infantry. When the assault force was about 25 metres from the enemy position they came under intense antitank, automatic small arms, and 82 mm mortar fire which halted the supporting infantry. Warrant Officer Class Two Richards on seeing this, stood on top of his Armoured Personnel Carrier, with total disregard for the intense enemy fire, and by shouting and waving attempted to rally the infantry to press home the assault. After a short delay the assault was pressed home, by the Armoured Personnel Carriers. Because of the lack of supporting infantry, Warrant Officer Class Two Richards dismounted some Armoured Personnel Carrier crewmen and led them in an infantry-type role through the village, seeking out and neutralising small groups of Viet Cong, until the village was securely held by Army of the Republic of Vietnam forces.

Warrant Officer Class Two Richards' coolness under fire, personal bravery and leadership, directly contributed to the success of the mission. His courage and initiative were an inspiration to the Army of the Republic of Vietnam soldiers and reflects great credit on himself and the Australian Regular Army.

 

Army Number: 54548

Substantive Rank: Lieutenant

Christian Name: Francis Adrian

Surname. ROBERTS

Award; MID

On the evening of 18 August 1966 Lieutenant Roberts commanded 3 Troop 1 Armoured Personnel Carrier Squadron which carried A Company, 6th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment to the relief of D Company, 6th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment, who were virtually surrounded by a vastly superior enemy force.

Lieutenant Robert's personal conduct in commanding and controlling his Troop was of the highest order. While moving to the D Company location, the Troop encountered an enemy Company equipped with anti-tank weapons, and at this time the Troop consisted of only seven armoured personnel carriers. After a short action the enemy withdrew east.

Continuing the advance the Troop moved through supporting artillery fire, as the fire could not be stopped due to a temporary loss of radio communications.

One crew Commander was seriously wounded in the chest, and was evacuated. The troop carried out a final assault and forced the enemy to withdraw from the D Company position.

Later, during the night, in pitch blackness, the Troop assisted in evacuating D Company and its casualties to a helicopter landing zone. lieutenant Roberts, under orders from the Officer Commanding D Company, acted as controller for the helicopters.

At all times lieutenant Roberts acted with skill and judgement and fought his Troop with determination and courage. The action was accomplished in spite of the poor radio communications existing in the 3 Troop vehicles, and in spite of heavy torrential rain and poor light during the enemy contacts.

 

Army Number: 235073

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name. Ronald Ellis

Surname: ROOKS

Honour or Award: MID

Major Ronald Rooks graduated from the Royal Military College, Duntroon on 15 December 1954 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. After a number of regimental and staff appointments in Australia, he was appointed to command B Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment. He arrived in Vietnam on 7 May 1969.

Major Rooks, throughout twelve months in command of B Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment on operations in South Vietnam, exercised command of his unit with a great deal of commonsense and understanding. His fine tactical sense and thorough appreciation of the use of his Armoured Personnel Carriers enabled him to give sound advice to the Task Force Commander and firm confident guidance to his troops.

During his tour of duty, the enemy intensified his use of mines causing more frequent and serious damage to the Armoured Personnel Carriers and increasing the casualties to crewmen in the Squadron. Despite this, Major Rooks inspired leadership was such that the Squadron was not daunted from any task and continued to operate at a high peak of efficiency.

The efficiency of the Squadron and the high regard in which it is held by the Infantry Battalions reflect great credit on Major Rooks ability.

 

Army Number: 2139599

Substantive Rank: Corporal

Temporary Rank: Sergeant

Christian Name: David William

Surname: SHEPPARD

Honour or Award; MID

Sergeant David William Sheppard's service in the Regular Army and the Citizens Military Forces commenced in early 1950. He re-enlisted in the Australian Regular Army on 14 August 1968, and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined B Squadron 3rd Cavalry Regiment in South Vietnam on 27 August 1969.

On 18 February 1970, Sergeant Sheppard's Cavalry Section was given the task of deploying a platoon of infantry into the jungle edge at the base of the Long Hai mountains. The platoon had just dismounted from the armoured personnel carriers when the force came under accurate enemy anti-tank rocket and small arms fire.

Sergeant Sheppard's vehicle was hit and penetrated by one of the anti-tank rockets, seriously wounding the driver and blowing Sergeant Sheppard out of the turret onto the ground. Although suffering from severe neck injuries, he immediately remounted his vehicle, organised his section into an all round defensive position and directed the fire of his section at the enemy.

His calm and determined action enabled the infantry platoon to reorganise and prevented the enemy from following up their initial success. His actions under fire were a credit to him and a fine example to all.

 

Army Number: 210321

Substantive Rank: Warrant Officer Class Two

Christian Name: Peter

Surname: SIMPSON

Honour or Award: MID

Warrant Officer Class Two Peter Simpson enlisted in the Australian Regular Army on 2 May 1951. He was allotted to the Royal Australian Ordnance Corps and after 12 months transferred to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He served in a variety of regimental and training appointments until 23 October 1967 when he was posted to C Squadron, 1st Armoured Regiment as Squadron Sergeant Major. He arrived in South Vietnam on 12 February 1968.

As a result of his undivided loyalty, sound judgement and tireless efforts, many of the problems of raising, training and committing the Squadron to operations overseas were foreseen and overcome. His self discipline and man management have been exceptional.

He has personally raised and trained the Squadron A echelon to an outstanding state of efficiency and has ensured that all requirements for maintenance and resupply have been promptly met. To do this he has willingly worked extremely long hours, often under the most arduous conditions, and on many occasions on big own initiative.

Warrant Officer Class Two Peter Simpson was able to instil such a sense of urgency and responsibility into the personnel of A echelon that, although by virtue of its role the personnel were constantly changing, the functioning of the echelon remained at a consistently high level. Through all this he always efficiently carried out the numerous other tasks that befall a Squadron Sergeant Major.

Warrant Officer Class Two Peter Simpson has been an inspiration to all members of C Squadron and has, by his own efforts, ensured that operational administration never hindered the tactical employment of the tanks, regardless of the area of operations or method of resupply.

 

Army Number: 335084

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Alexander Henry

Surname: SMITH

Honour or Award: MID

Major Alexander Henry Smith graduated from the Royal Military College, Duntroon in December 1955. He has served in various regimental and training appointments in Australia and overseas. In January 1969, he arrived in South Vietnam to command B Squadron, lst Armoured Regiment,

With determination, initiative and drive Major Smith has welded his Squadron into an effective fighting unit with a high reputation amongst Australians and with allied forces. Units appreciate the reliability of B Squadron and continually request tank support for their operations.

B Squadron, lst Armoured Regiment has been responsible for pacification operations in a rural district of Phuoc My Province. Through the personal leadership and meticulous planning of Major Smith, the Squadron has achieved security for a large number of villages and hamlets in this district. He has achieved a fine working relationship with village and district officials and has done much to help upgrade the local regional forces in the area.

His period of command in South Vietnam has been one of constant challenge. By close attention to detail he has managed to meet this and maintain a high rate of availability of tanks to support Task Force operations.

The sound tactical ability and fine leadership of Major Smith have been an inspiration to the troops he commanded and reflect great credit on himself and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 42011

Substantive Rank: Sergeant

Temporary Rank: Warrant Officer Class Two

Christian Name: Graham Bruce

Surname: SNOOK

Honour or Award: MID

After enlisting in the Australian Regular Army in 1957, Warrant Officer Snook served with the First Armoured Regiment and at the Armoured Centre. He joined the Australian Army Training Team in Vietnam in November 1967 and was appointed adviser to the 7th Armoured Cavalry Squadron, Army of the Republic of Vietnam.

On 3 February 1968 the Squadron was ordered to break through the enemy cordon around the City of Hue to relieve the defenders in the Citadel. As they approached the City, the two leading armoured personnel carriers were disabled by anti-tank fire. Warrant Officer Snook, who was in the third carrier, heard a wounded soldier calling for help. With complete disregard for his own safety, he left his own carrier to aid the wounded soldier. Under fire, he carried him into a nearby ditch and covered the wounded soldier with his own body, until the firing subsided enough for him to carry the soldier back to the third carrier. Shortly after, the enemy launched another attack on the leading carriers and Warrant Officer Snook again exposed himself to small arms fire to return fire with his pistol until the carrier bearing the wounded soldier could be driven to safety.

On a number of other occasions Warrant Officer Snook has shown exceptional bravery, and his gallantry, dedication to duty and professionalism have been an inspiration to all who have served with him.

 

Army Number: 5715553

Substantive Rank: Trooper

Temporary Rank: Corporal

Christian Name: Peter Frazer

Surname: STRUDWICK

Honour or Award: MM

Corporal Peter Frazer Strudwick, a National Serviceman, commenced his military service on 4 October 1967, and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined 3rd Cavalry Regiment in South Vietnam on 15 October 1968.

On 6 June 1969, Corporal Strudwick's troop was deployed to the village of Binh Ba, where they came under heavy enemy anti-tank and small arms fire during house to house fighting. The infantry on the right were pinned down by intense machine gun fire from a house. A tank which moved forward in support, was forced to withdraw because of accurate anti-tank fire.

Corporal Strudwick immediately moved the armoured personnel carrier he was commanding into open ground to outflank the enemy anti-tank rocket position. Although his vehicle was without support from the remainder of his Troop, he remained in an exposed position and directed accurate machine gun fire killing the anti-tank rocket crew. He remained in this position neutralising the enemy machine gun until such time as the tank moved forward and destroyed the machine gun position.

Corporal Strudwick continued for the remainder of the operation to show outstanding bravery and initiative during similar incidents. On all occasions, he has displayed above average leadership qualities in actions against the enemy. His prompt and courageous actions have been an inspiration to all, and in the highest traditions of his Corps and the Australian Army.

  

  Army Number: 2783093

  Substantive Rank: Second lieutenant

  Christian Name: Brian John

  Surname: SULLIVAN

  Honour or Award: MC

Second lieutenant Brian Sullivan graduated from the Officer Training Unit, Scheyville, on 22 July 1966 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined C Squadron, lst Armoured Regiment in South Vietnam on 5 August 1968, and B Squadron on 11 February 1969.

On 6 June 1969, Second Lieutenant Sullivan, Troop Commander, lst Troop B Squadron, was supporting D Company, 5th Battalion ' The Royal Australian Regiment. On arrival at Binh Ba Village, Phuoc Tuy Province, the company group immediately encountered heavy, sustained anti-tank and small arms fire from strong elements of a North Vietnamese Regiment. Counter action by the force involved sweeps through the village with armour leading, followed by a detailed search by infantry supported by armour. House to house fighting developed.

In the face of constant anti-tank rocket fire, Second Lieutenant Sullivan showed no hesitation in leading the Australian assault into the village. He and his troop were constantly required to destroy enemy strong points and retaliate to heavy enemy fire. Throughout heavy fighting for more than two hours, Second Lieutenant Sullivan's tanks bore the brunt of the action. Countless rockets were fired at Second Lieutenant Sullivans tank. One wounded him. Despite this, and penetration by rockets of three other tanks with subsequent casualties, he and his Troop continued to fight with aggression.

His cool leadership and gallantry were an inspiration to all on that day. He paved the way for the remainder of the force to defeat the enemy.

On many other occasions Second lieutenant Sullivan displayed the same attributes. His performance throughout 1969 was characterised by cheerfulness, conscientiousness, and courage. His attitude and conduct demands great admiration and reflects considerable credit upon himself, his Regiment and the Australian Army.

Army Number; 2783093

Substantive Rank: Second Lieutenant

Christian Name: Brian John

Surname: SULLIVAN

MID. Now upgraded to Medal for Gallantry (MG)

Second Lieutenant Sullivan graduated from the Officer Training Unit, Scheyville, on 22 July 1966 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined C Squadron, lst Armoured Regiment in South Vietnam on 5 August 1968, and B Squadron on 111 February 1969.

On 16 February 1969, Second Lieutenant Sullivan was commanding 1st Troop, B Squadron, 1st Armoured Regiment, supporting B Company, 4th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment on a search for a protected arms cache.

At approximately 1320 hours the company headquarters came under heavy fire from claymores, rockets and automatic weapons, from a bunker system about 30 metres away. Five casualties occurred in the initial exchange of fire.

Second Lieutenant Sullivan moved his Troop forward of the casualties to protect them and to cover the deployment of the platoons. The Troop was then heavily engaged with RPG and machine gun fire. One tank was hit repeatedly, caught fire and the entire crew wounded.

Second Lieutenant Sullivan then dismounted from his own tank and, under fire, ran forward, engaging the enemy with his pistol, mounted the burning tank, extricated its wounded driver, and then backed it out from under the enemy rocket fire. He then returned to his own tank and continued to engage the enemy until the contact was broken at 1500 hours,

His actions enabled the dead and wounded to be evacuated, prevented the company from sustaining greater casualties and enabled the infantry to redeploy. Throughout the engagement Second Lieutenant Sullivan displayed outstanding leadership and personal courage. His actions were a credit to himself and the service.

 

Army Number: 217083

Substantive Rank: Lance Corporal

Temporary Rank: Corporal

Christian Name: Jeffery James

Surname: SWAN

Honour or Award: MID

Corporal Jeffery James Swan enlisted in the Australian Regular Army on 24 August 1966 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined B Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment in South Vietnam on 19 December 1968.

On the afternoon of 21 May 1970, Corporal Swan was commanding an armoured personnel carrier in a combined infantry and armoured force, when contact was made with the enemy in a strongly held bunker system.

In the first few minutes of the contact one soldier was killed and twelve wounded. One of the infantry sections, in a dangerously exposed position and under continuous enemy fire from both anti-tank rockets and small arms, was unable to evacuate its wounded.

With deliberate disregard for his own safety, Corporal Swan manoeuvred his armoured personnel carrier into the area of enemy fire so that the casualties could be removed from the danger of the heavy small arms fire. Although his carrier was struck by an enemy anti-tank rocket, he removed one group of the wounded to a safe area before returning for the remainder.

His calmness in the face of the enemy, and his fine example were a credit to himself, his Regiment and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 54702

Rank: Second Lieutenant

Christian Name: Roger Leslie

Surname. TINGLEY

Award: MC

Second Lieutenant Roger Tingley enlisted in the Australian Regular Army on 2 May 1963, was commissioned on 11 December 1965, and allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He joined 3rd Cavalry Regiment in November 1966, and arrived in South Vietnam to join A Squadron in April 1967.

On 1 February 1968, as commander of 3rd Troop A Squadron 3rd Cavalry Regiment, Second Lieutenant Tingley assisted in the defence of Sector Headquarters in Baria, Phuoc Tuy Province. His troop was in contact from approximately 0845 hours until 1910 hours, during which time they evacuated twenty-eight casualties as well as providing support to the infantry company and assisting in the defence of Sector Headquarters. While under sniper fire Second Lieutenant Tingley killed three snipers. Later when his armoured personnel carrier was struck by a rocket he continued to fire his machine gun and killed the enemy who engaged him. He changed vehicles and when another carrier near him was hit by a rocket he brought his own vehicle between it and the enemy. He engaged the enemy but his own vehicle was then hit. He was wounded and thrown from his vehicle.

Later he directed armed-helicopter fire which assisted the recovery of the two damaged vehicles.

In all these events, the high degree of personal bravery and initiative shown by Second Lieutenant Tingley reflects great credit upon himself, his Regiment and the Australian Regular Army.

 

Army Number: 590

Substantive Rank: Lieutenant Colonel

Christian Name: Martin Terence

Surname: TRIPP

Honour or Award: OBE

Lieutenant Colonel Martin Terence Tripp was commissioned in the Royal Australian Armoured Corps on 13 December 1944. Following several regimental and staff appointments in Australia and overseas he was appointed as the Commanding Officer of the Australian Army Training Team Vietnam on 13 February 1967. Lieutenant Colonel Tripp has distinguished himself by extremely meritorious conduct in the performance of his duties during his tour in South Vietnam. The Australian Army Training Team operates in all Corps Zones throughout South Vietnam and Lieutenant Colonel Tripp displayed outstanding leadership in the control and administration of the widely dispersed individuals and groups forming the Team. This has entailed regularly visiting each duty location where he has on many occasions come under hostile fire.

Throughout his tour he has displayed outstanding professional skill and competence. He has made a most significant contribution to the high esteem in which the Australian Army Training Team Vietnam is held by the Vietnamese Army, and United States Army advisers with whom the Training Team live and work. lieutenant Colonel Tripp's sense of duty, loyalty, professional skill and capacity for hard work under the most trying conditions have been an inspiration to all who serve with him.

 

Army Number: 18666

Substantive Rank: Captain

Christian Name: Kerry Charles

Surname: TUNBRIDGE

Honour or Award: MID. Now upgraded to Commendation For Distinguished Service

Captain Kerry Tunbridge graduated from the officer cadet school on 14 December 1963 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. He joined B Squadron 3rd Cavalry Light Aid Detachment in South Vietnam in November 1970. He continued to serve with B Squadron 3rd Cavalry Light Aid Detachment in 1971.

As the Officer Commanding the Light Aid Detachment, Captain Tunbridge has been responsible for the repair and maintenance of 70 armoured vehicles, including automotive equipment which has involved repair in the field under tactical conditions as well as work in the Nui Dat Task Force Base.

The fact that the Squadron has been able to maintain a high serviceability rate and thus meet its allotted tasks has largely been due to the initiative, courage and technical competence of Captain Tunbridge.


Faced with the many complexities of an officer commander a Light Aid Detachment and the responsibilities of leadership, the commitment shown by Captain Tunbridge reflects great credit upon himself, his Corps and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 2887

Rank: Warrant Officer Class Two

Christian Name: Percy

Surname: WHITE

Award: DCM

Warrant Officer Percy White joined the Australian Army Training Team in Vietnam in March 1967. On 28 December he was serving as an adviser to a South Vietnamese armoured unit when the unit, with infantry, was ordered to attack. Warrant Officer White was on the lead vehicle when heavy enemy fire killed the commander of the vehicle, and another soldier. It also disabled the vehicle's radio. The infantry dismounted and attacked the enemy who were entrenched in a wooded fortified position. The infantry attack was halted by intense fire. Warrant Officer White, unable to communicate with the rest of his force, left the relative security of his armoured carrier and dashed forward over ground swept by enemy fire to assist the infantry commander who was without an adviser. He placed himself at the head of the troops and with complete disregard for his own safety set an example which led to the assault being successful.

He again distinguished himself on 30 January 1968 when he volunteered to join a small reconnaissance party to an engineer compound which had been occupied by the enemy in Hoi An City. Having gained entry to the compound the six-man party became involved in a fierce fire fight. Although wounded, Warrant Officer White repeatedly exposed himself to the enemy so that he could better direct the fire and movement of a relief force over his radio. His outstanding bravery and leadership were a major factor in ejecting the enemy from the compound. On a number of other occasions, Warrant Officer White has shown outstanding conduct under fire. His leadership and personal bravery have been an inspiration to the Vietnamese troops and advisers with whom he has served and he has brought great credit on the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 15446

Substantive Rank: Sergeant

Christian Name: Joseph Archibald

Surname: WILSON

Honour or Award: MID

Sergeant Joseph Archibald Wilson enlisted in the Australian Regular Army on 24 April 1951 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Infantry Corps. He served with the lat Battalion, 7he Royal Australian Regiment in Korea for two years. He was discharged as a Corporal in 1957. He re-enlisted on 20 November 1959 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He has served continuously with that corps for ten years. He arrived in South Vietnam on 10 February 1969.

Shortly after arrival he was sent to the Headquarters Duc Thanh District, Phuoc Tuy Province, as a liaison Officer for lst Australian Task Force. His duties involved coordination and supervision of both pacification and operational projects. His responsibilities were far greater than those expected of a non commissioned officer, but he responded magnificently.

Many pacification projects and activities were originated or coordinated by Sergeant Wilson. Projects included village defence construction, road repair, school renovations, installation improvements and constant field liaison.

He became well known throughout the District and constantly moved out, regardless of personal safety. He was particularly effective in cementing good relations with the people, mainly due to his favourable disposition and workmanship. In August 1969, he received the South Vietnamese Psychological Warfare award in recognition of his efforts.

His work and his attitude have been an inspiration to his fellow soldiers and his officers. He has provoked genuine friendship from the South Vietnamese people. Sergeant Wilson is a true ambassador for the Australian Army.

 

Army Number; 3163

Substantive Rank: Brigadier

Christian Name: Cedric Maudsley Ingram

Surname: PEARSON

Honour or Award. DSO

Brigadier Cedric Maudsley Ingram Pearson graduated from the Royal Military College Duntroon in August 1940. He served in a number of command and staff appointments in Australia and overseas and was appointed, in October 1968, Commander lst Australian Task Force, which was deployed on active service in Phuoc Tuy Province of South Vietnam.

During his period of command Brigadier Pearson has continuously maintained an aggressive policy and has personally planned, direct ed and controlled Task Force operations often from his forward headquarters in the field. Through his strong personality and personal example he has encouraged those units under his command constantly to give of their best despite the arduous weather and the difficulties of fighting an elusive enemy in a tropical environment.

His professional skill has been outstanding; his knowledge of the enemy and their capabilities has made it possible for the Task Force to operate over a wide area in their pursuit.

At all times he has ensured adequate logistic support was provided and has given constant thought and attention to the men under his command. Through his efforts, the morale and welfare of the Task Force has been of a high order.

Brigadier Pearson is held in very high regard by Allied Commanders in III Corps area and has established excellent relations with them. His sound guidance has enabled considerable progress to he made in the training of units of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam, and in pacification measures in Phuoc Tuy Province.

 

Army Number: 3481

Substantive Rank. Lieutenant Colonel

Christian Name. Kevin William

Surname: LATCHFORD

Honour or Award: MID

Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Latchford graduated from the Royal Military College, Duntroon, on 10 December 1947 and was allotted to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He then served in a variety of regimental, instructional and staff appointments in Australia and underwent advanced armoured corps training in the United Kingdom and Germany. He arrived in South Vietnam on 15 March 1968.

During his period in command of his unit in South Vietnam, Lieutenant Colonel Latchford has achieved outstanding results in planning and implementing the military civil action assistance program. His unfailing energy and drive, together with sound judgement and a keen understanding of the needs of the South Vietnamese civilian community, have been a major factor in the success of the Australian contribution in this field.

He has established a working relationship with the Government of South Vietnam authorities and their United States advisers which has produced results of the highest order.

He has shown enterprise in producing results out of all proportion to his limited resources and the achievements of his unit have been a major factor in the harmonious relationship which exists between the Australian Force and the civil community.

 

Army Number. 13131

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Graham Roy

Surname: LOVEGROVE

Honour or Award: MBE

Major Graham Lovegrove was commissioned on 26 June 1953 and after serving in a variety of regimental and staff appointments assumed duty as Deputy Assistant Adjutant General, Headquarters Australian Force (Army Component) Vietnam on 9 July 1969.

To the difficult and demanding tasks confronting him in this appointment he applied a detailed knowledge and sound understanding of the administrative requirements of Commanders, units and soldiers of the Force. Its enthusiastic and tireless application to his duties ensured that the staff and service advisers combined to form the effective administrative team necessary to fulfil those requirements. He consistently showed a human understanding and sympathy which proved especially valuable in dealing with the many personal and singular problems affecting the individual soldier.

His outstanding service to the Australian Force Vietnam reflects great credit on Major Lovegrove and the Australian Army.

 

Army Number: 335039

Substantive Rank: Major

Christian Name: Alan Desmond

Surname: WELLS

Honour or Award. MBE

Major Alan Desmond Wells graduated from the Royal Military College on 10 December 1952 and was commissioned in to the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. He served with 3rd Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment in Korea and since then has served in staff, training and regimental appointments including two years at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst.

In January 1967, Major Wells was appointed Deputy Assistant Quartermaster General of lst Australian Task Force in South Vietnam. In this appointment he was responsible for the maintenance and movement of all units in the Task Force Base and during operations, of the fighting forces in the field.

Soon after arrival, Major Wells formed his staff into a harmonious and highly efficient team, who under his supervision and direction, provided the logistic support for every operation during 1967, as well as continuous support within the Base Area.

Major Wells constantly sought ways and means of utilising more efficiently the use of transport air support and resupply by sea and land during operations. His success in this field was outstanding and resulted in a feeling of confidence by all ranks, right down to the individual rifleman.

The present systems of operational maintenance, involving the rapid deployment of men, materials, guns and ammunition from the Task Force Base to the operational areas and return, is due almost entirely to the research, planning and organization by Major Wells. His continual efforts in this field have made a significant contribution to the success of operations against the Viet Cong in Phuoc Tuy Province.

   

 

FOREIGN AWARDS

Hopefully this list is complete and correct. If not please notify me ASAP and if anyone can put me in the right direction to gain the Citations for the following awards, I would be extremely grateful.

The following list was compiled with thanks by Ian Mc Vie

Webmaster.

 

U.S.A. GALLANTRY AWARDS TO RAAC PERSONNEL- SOUTH VIETNAM

Silver Star

2887 WO2 P. WHITE

Bronze Star for Valour

21977 WO2 J. A. BOND

27881 CAPT C. S. StA. CONNOR                             

42011 WO2 G. B. SNOOK

U.S.A. MERITORIUS AWARDS TO RAAC PERSONNEL- SOUTH VIETNAM

 

Bronze Star for Meritorious Service

28038 MAJ E. J. ELLIS

31440 WO1 E. W. GASON

51407 CAPT R. K. HILL                                                

 32219 WO1 J. N. HARROWER                                                

 32129 WO1 J. B. STAUNTON-LATIMER

 1480 WO2 D. C. TAYLOR

 237688 MAJ G. M. TEMPLETON

 

United States Meritorious Unit Citation

21977 WO2 J. A. BOND

24170 WO1 R. M. ALMOND

25761 WO2 L. N. BOOTES

34623 WO2 W. G. BRENNAN

11947 CAPT D. H. CAMPBELL

29593 MAJ J. R. CLARKE

32183 WO2 J. R. COUTTS

217209 CAPT W. R. DEANE

33306 WO2 R. E. DILLOW

54262 WO2 J. F. GHILOTTI

31440 WO1 E. W. GASON

235096 MAJ R. E. HAGERTY

41335 WO2 R. G. HARRIS

32219 WO1 J. N. HARROWER

35348 WO2 A. K. HUNTER

28703 CAPT P. C. JARRATT

29494 SGT R. J. KENNEDY

213146 CAPT J. A. LEGGETT

27757 WO1 T. F. MALONE

1117 LTCOL J. F. MONAGHAN

47020 MAJ R. J. MOYLE

42352 WO2 T. D. PHILLIPS

41451 WO2 K. J. ROWE

36687 CAPT J. SCALES

42011 WO2 G.  B. SNOOK

32199 WO1 J. B. STAUNTON-LATIMER

311013 WO2 H. J. STUTTARD

1480 WO2 D. C. TAYLOR

237688 MAJ G. M. TEMPLETON

14119 WO2 D. J. TUDMAN

36664 LT R. B. WADE

2887 WO2 P. WHITE

37709  CPL S. HANUSZEWICZ

                                  

Joint Services Commendation Medal for Service

 28038 MAJ E. J. ELLIS

 

Army Commendation Medal for Valor

312784 2LT D. E. PAKES

 

Army Commendation Medal for Service

24170 WO1 R. M. ALMOND

19955 WO2 F. J. J. BEATTIE

17053 MAJ P. W. BOURKE

24434 WO1 E. C. BURNS

27881 MAJ C. S. StA CONNOR

43344 MAJ J. W. McENERNY

54211 WO2 G. L. MILLINGTON  

17050 MAJ K. R. PHILIIPS

53210 WO2 R. H. GREIG

 

Air Medal for Service

28038 MAJ E. J. ELLIS

 

 

REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM MILITARY AWARDS TO RAAC PERSONNEL

 

Cross of Gallantry (with Palm)

35974 WO2 W. J. NOBLE

Cross of Gallantry (with Gold Star)

17023 MAJ H. J. COATES

33306 WO2 R. E. J. DILLOW

34702 2LT R. L. TINGLEY

54570 CPL P.E. CLEMENTS

 

Cross of Gallantry (with Silver Star) and Bar

11947 CAPT D. H. CAMPBELL

 

Cross of Gallantry (with Silver Star)

24170 WO1 R. M. ALMOND

27881 MAJ C. S. StA CONNOR

31440 WO1 E. W. GASON

41335 WO2 R. G. HARRIS

25348 WO2 A. K. HUNTER

37178 SGT E. W. LEVY

35974 WO2 W. J. NOBLE

32199 WO1 J. B. STAUNTON-LATIMER

1480 WO2 D. C. TAYLOR

590 LT COL M. T. TRIPP

2887 WO2 P. WHITE

4717530 TPR P. McNAMARA

213099 SGT R. RICHARDS

 

Cross of Gallantry (with Bronze Star)

24170 WO1 R. M. ALMOND

19955 WO2 F. J. J. BEATTIE

54262 WO2 J. F. GHILOTTI

3138385 2LT W. M. HIND

311013 WO2 H. J. W. STUDDARD

54702 2LT R. M. TINGLEY

36664 WO2 R. B. WADE

37709  CPL S. HANUSZEWICZ

 

Military Life Saving Medal

28038 MAJ E. J. ELLIS

213146 CAPT J. A. LEGGETT

Armed Forces Honour Medal 1st Class

24170 WO1 R. M. ALMOND

25761 WO2 L. N. BOOTES

53023 MAJ M. A. COUNT

32219 WO1 J. N. HARROWER

53185 CAPT P. R. LOFTHOUSE

27757 WO1 T. F. MALONE

54548 CAPT F. A. ROBERTS

237688 MAJ G. M. TEMPLETON

28038 MAJ E. J. ELLIS

25631 MAJ J. F. WILLIAMS

 

Armed Forces Honour Medal 2nd Class

19955 WO2 F. J. J. BEATTIE

24434 WO1 E. C. BURNS

54267 WO2 J. F. GHILOTTI

21734 WO1 L. B. GREEN

 

Staff Service Medal 1st Class

42609 LT F. E. DOERR

25631 MAJ J. F. WILLIAMS

 

Technical Service Medal 1st Class

 28038 MAJ E. J. ELLIS

 

Training Service Medal 2nd Class

2887 WO2 P. WHITE

 

Civil Actions Medal 1st Class

13372 MAJ J. F. LOFTHOUSE

28038 MAJ E. J. ELLIS

 

REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM CIVIL AWARDS TO RAAC PERSONNEL

 

National Medal of Merit

26165 WO1 T. F. MALONE

 

Rural Revolutionary Development Service Medal

28038 MAJ E. J. ELLIS

13372 MAJ J. V. LOFTHOUSE

213759 CAPT C. J. A. SUTTON

Ethnic Minorities Medal 1st Class

 213759 CAPT C. J. A. SUTTON

 

Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm Unit Citation

17024 LTCOL M. W. FARMER

21734 WO2 L. B. G. GREEN

54211 WO2 G. L. MILLINGTON

35974 WO2 W. J. NOBLE

17050 LTCOL K. R. PHILLIPS

54548 CAPT F. A. ROBERTS